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The Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) announced that it will incorporate several aspects of the IBM (NYSE: IBM) Security portfolio into its national cybersecurity training initiatives.

TEEX focuses on providing cybersecurity training and technical assistance to public and private organizations across all 50 states as well as U.S. territories. They help train front-line employees, IT staff and management on the threats and risks, preventative activities, response actions, and recovery steps associated with a possible cyberattack. These services are trusted by federal agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense, to help bolster nation-wide cybersecurity resiliency efforts.

IBM Corporation logo (PRNewsfoto/IBM)

Under the agreement, the TEEX Cyber Readiness Center will incorporate IBM X-Force Red’s Offensive Security Services portfolio to help further the Center’s existing suite of enterprise technical assistance services. These services are focused on providing holistic cybersecurity assessments, developing plans and training, and facilitating customized cybersecurity exercises.

The Center will also use the IBM Security X-Force’s integrated security threat intelligence, incident response and remediation services. These services are designed to help organizations minimize the loss of revenue caused by a security incident.

TEEX is a founding member of the National Cybersecurity Preparedness Consortium. It helps organizations assess and develop a security-minded culture within their organization as well as verify the work of their internal teams and managed service providers to keep them protected against ever-changing threats.

“We’re excited about this new agreement with IBM because their professional services and security intelligence capabilities merge perfectly with our cybersecurity training and technical assistance expertise,” said Scott Terry, Director of the TEEX Cyber Readiness Center. “TEEX works to measure the effectiveness of an organization’s cybersecurity program. Today, that experience and commitment is growing. The available specialized response and recovery capabilities of IBM add an entirely new dimension to our services, allowing for even deeper assessments. Together our leveraged competencies can help improve the cyber preparedness and resiliency of entities across the state and nation.”

The FBI has reported growth in online extorsion scams and other cybercrimes since the onset of COVID-19.  Public and private organizations, both large and small, often struggle to stay ahead.

“Blending our X-Force Red team of hackers who use a ‘think like an attacker’ mentality to help uncover and fix security vulnerabilities across infrastructure with the TEEX team’s decades of experience in private industry, military, emergency response and government cybersecurity applications will help us both focus on continuously expanding services and related expertise at the rate and pace of threat actors,” said Charles Henderson, Global Head and Managing Partner of IBM X-Force Red.

About TEEX
The Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) is an internationally recognized leader in the delivery of emergency response, homeland security and workforce training, exercises, technical assistance, and economic development. A member of The Texas A&M University System, TEEX served more than 200,000 people from across the United States and 100 countries last year through hands-on training and technical services.

About IBM
IBM is a global leader in business transformation, serving clients in more than 170 countries around the world with open hybrid cloud and AI technology. For more information, please visit here.

Media Contact:
Carrie Bendzsa
613-796-3880
carrie.bendzsa@ca.ibm.com

TEEX Cyber Readiness Center
Email: CyberReady@teex.tamu.edu
800-541-7149

Contact Information

Kathy Fraser

Director of Marketing and Communications

The course exceeded my expectations by leaps and bounds.

— Processing Evidence of Violent Crimes
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